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20121002
20121010
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CNN 7
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CSPAN 6
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CSPAN2 5
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MSNBC 5
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 67 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
science on earth. and this is an odd kind of expedition for another reason. usually scientists go off in different directions, different times using their own tools. for mer the entire team was all together. 150 scientists and engineers balancing together, as it were, like on a huge skateboard creeping over the sand, up the down and hills and craters meters at a time for eight years. so it's something like being on a ship, on an early voyageover discovery. the scientists and the sailing crew were all having to travel together. they had to negotiate how long are we going to stay here in where are we going to go next in and what should we do at each site? and this requires a well coordinated understanding of their roles, schedules, resources, long-term plans and a clear chain of command. if you visited the science and engineering coordination meeting during the prime mission, which was the first 90 days of landing on mars in 2004, same thing we're going through now with curiosity during these 90 days, you could see the scientists up front on the bridge, as it were, with huge displays of
MSNBC
Oct 9, 2012 2:00pm PDT
, the rogue's gallery of republicans who don't believe science. wait until you catch this science committee in the house and it's membership. this is "hardball," the place for politics. well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td amerit
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30am EDT
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 12:00pm EDT
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
MSNBC
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am PDT
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
CNN
Oct 4, 2012 7:00pm PDT
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. in raw politics tonight, more on president obama's performance last night in denver, as we have been reporting president obama himself knows that he lost the debate. he's upset about it. here to talk about it tonight, obama 2012 pollster, cornell belcher. also, ralph reed. cornell, bored, aloof, some said even arrogant. those are some of the words used today and last night to describe president obama on that stage. what exactly was the strategy heading into this? was there a strategy? >> what you saw last night from the president was the president trying to lay out the facts to those few undecided voters that are still out there. here's our plan, here's how we want to move the country forward versus mitt romney and his plan about moving the country forward. the problem with the debate last night is that one candidate showed up talking about the facts of their plan and the other candidate showed up with a completely different plan, and was completely dishonest about
CNBC
Oct 3, 2012 8:00pm EDT
, improving how we train teachers. now i want to hire another thousand math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it particularly for manufacturing. taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close loopholes that are giving incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to give breaks to those investing in the united states. on energy, we both agree we've got to boost american production. oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. now, all of this is possible. in order for us to do it we'll have to close our deficit. one of the things tonight we'll discuss is how do we deal with our tax code and make sure we're reducing spending in a r
CNN
Oct 9, 2012 4:00am PDT
and in advances in engineering and science. >> be interesting to see and crazy if he's able to do it. let's talk about your book "mousetronaut." >> the true part of this story, in 2001 i was the pilot. we had 18 mice. of those 18 mice 17 stayed kind of latched on to the inside of their cages. very nervous about being in space. one little guy seemed to get it, enjoyed weightlessness. we enjoyed watching him a little bit and that was until period us the to this story. >> it took a bunch of years before you turned it into a children's book. why did you think it should be a children's book. why did you go into that area? >> well, you know, we have a crisis in education in this country. and, you know, by most measures and some different coordination when you look at where the united states is, you know, whether it's early childhood education or math scores for high school students, we're often not even in the top 50 any more where we used to be at the top. i think it's important to have, you know, material for young kids to be interested in, and, you know, my experience has been that kids are interes
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 7:00am EDT
years of english, three years of science, math, and social science, compared to those who didn't complete a core curriculum, those who completed the core curriculum scored 144 points higher than those who did not. when we look at those who took honors courses, they scored nearly 300 points above those who did not take honors or ap courses. rigor of the academic course load in high school leads to do better on the s.a.t. and leads students to being better prepared for college. let me give you this information in terms of framing the challenge of our country faces. for every 100 ninth graders, only 70 will graduate from high school. 44 local want to college. only 30 students will enroll in the second year of college. only 21 will graduate from a four-year institution in a six- year period of time. that is not good enough to keep the united states competitive in a global economy. we are very much focused on having high expectations for all students and doing what we can to better prepare students for college success and keep those high expectations for all students coming from all
CNN
Oct 4, 2012 5:00pm PDT
, very well by good science, it is very risky for black men to show any signs of aggression. so when a black man shows a sign of aggression, people say see? so it confirms a stereotype about black men. >> even when you're a black man who's president of the united states? >> yes. absolutely. >> you're saying this part of the debate where we're talking about the role of the federal government is notable. >> yes. what i think is interesting, this movement right here where romney is shifting from side to side, to me it looks like he's a boxer. again, it gets at this idea that romney sees this kind of as a boxing match, and he's kind of like preparing to go on by shifting his weight from side to side, he's kind of getting himself ready. you don't see obama doing anything like that. >> you have a closing two minutes. >> does that tell you anything when he wipes his lip? >> might have noticed throughout that he is sweating sort of on his upper lip, and he's aware of that and he wants to mop that away before his closing argument. so he wants to make sure that he looks really strong, and it's
FOX News
Oct 6, 2012 3:00pm PDT
estrich, a fox news contributor and professor of law and political science at the university of southern california. let's do it. we are operating within the margin of error. general consensus, saying president obama was less than effervescent in the first of the debates. but, those latest... >> effervescent is kind. >> arthel: the poll numbers -- i try. the poll numbers, the governor, gosh romney came out with shining stars and does it mean, the stakes are higher for the vp debate? voters are actually looking into the debates and are tuning in and, are looking for answers. >> vp debates matter, if they -- if vp debates matter i would have been attorney general top of the united states instead of back to teaching and you played the clip, where bentsen squashed dan quayle and, we had our campaign chairman and governor clinton and our top staff and went to a little bar, across the street, and we were high, high on excitement and we waited for the numbers to come in from our pollster and when we called him, he said you want the good news or the bad news? and, i always go for bad news and he
FOX News
Oct 7, 2012 11:00am PDT
but happen to share a region of science and security. jobs depend on our abuilt to put a greater priority on the nation's defense and a balanced budget than it does on more tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires. >> chris: senator? >> i just have to make two points. first of all, we know from bob woodward's book this was the president's idea on sequestration. second, do you know that when the president was in the senate he and hillary clinton introduced a bill to allow workers to have greater notice but now he doesn't want to comply with the law because these notices will fall right before the election. here is the most disturbing fact. what sequestration does to our national security and this president has not shown leadership and i'm deeply concerned. he should be leading the effort right now in congress to resolve this. >> he is. >> chris: less than a minute left. early indications after the debate that romney got some kind of bump in the polls. i will ask you both briefly, 30 seconds each. governor, where does this race stand right now? >> i think we have three more debates coming
PBS
Oct 7, 2012 6:30pm PDT
arts and sciences. here's part of the video presentation that introduced them to the emmy audience. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists in the united states. pioneers and advocates. for more than two decades maria and george have informed million of hispanics through the popular evening newscast. their brand of journalism is characterized not only by subjective and perspectives, but also by a high degree of social advocacy. in the last three decades both have covered a wide range of news and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in
FOX
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm PDT
of science and security and jobs depend on our ability to put a greater priority on our nation's defense and a balanced budget than more tax cuts for millionaires and bill -- billionaires. >> bob woodward's book said it was the president's idea on sequestration, what is ironic, when the president was in the senator he and hillary clinton introduced a bill to allow workers to have greater notice and now doesn't want to comply with the law because the notices fall before the election and here's the most disturbing fact. what sequestration does to our national security and this president has not shown leadership, and i'm deeply concerned. he should be leading the effort now in congress to resolve this. >> chris: we have less than a minute left and i'd like you to share it equally. early indications, after the debate, that romney got some kind of bump in the polls, i would ask you both, briefly, 30 seconds, each, governor, where does the race stand now. >> i think we have three more debates coming up, one of which is the vice presidential campaign. where paul ryan has been very specific abou
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 3:00pm PDT
results in just two days. the research was published in the journal, "science translational medicine." the paper reported the tests of just six newborns in neonatal units, but the implications could be widespread. roughly 20% of infant deaths in the u.s. are caused by inherited genetic conditions, according to the study. doctor stephen kingsmore led the research team at children's mercy hospitals in kansas city. he's the director for the center for pediatric genomic medicine there. dr. kingsmore, welcome, and thank you for being with us. first of all,-- >> thank you very much. >> warner: how big a breakthrough is this? >> this is a big breakthrough. we've been working toward this goal for a coup of years now. there has been a big gap between the knowledge that we have of genetic diseases, about 35% of them, and the ability for doctors to identify which of these was a problem in any given child with an illness. >> warner: and up until now, how much have you been able to diagnose the d.n.a. abnormalities? how quickly? i mean, i said it can take weeks and weeks, but what's the process t
CNBC
Oct 5, 2012 6:00am EDT
creation that is better than most states. we have in our science and technology sector, very strong sector growing, life science, biotech, i.t., professional services, health care with johns hopkins and others. >> governor? >> yes, sir. >> we had already, when the president proposed the american jobs act, we had already been over letting the bush tax cuts expire just for the rich, and keeping them for people less than 250. we had already had that argument three or four times and it was clear from the composition of congress at the time that the president put forth the american jobs act that there was no way that was going to happen. so letting it, where that was going to be a provision in the american jobs act was pure political posturing and in no way, he knew there was no way that that was going to pass. i just take issue with you saying that this was all republicans saying that they weren't going to, they were going to make sure the jobless rate was much higher. he knew full well that he could back them into the obstructionist corner by saying that we're definitely going to do that, mak
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 8:00pm EDT
science monitor, you talked about being wary of tax proposal that give a rate but don't say how they will get there and you talk about entitlement reform but did not give specifics about how you like to get there. are there some things that you think would be possible for democrats? what is good on the reform ? the purpose of this speech is not to lay out a space of a plan on either side. i am as letting out broad directions because i think if we don't change the direction of tax reform, we will never get a deal. make no mistake about it -- democrats are willing to do serious entitlement reform providing we keep the safety net. and there are lots of ways to do it. in fact, during the negotiations between speaker john boehner and the president, no one said that broke down on the basis of entitlement reform. i don't know single news report that said that. every time we have come to a deadlock and getting deficit reduction, it has been revenues that have been the sticking point. i think i am certain that democrats are willing to step up to the plate of entitlement reform provided i
CNN
Oct 2, 2012 9:00am PDT
. there is some corals that live for many thousands of yeernz we found through some of the science we do we can drill holes down to the center of the corals and look at annual growth rings and we can look at when, in fact, when the first agriculture in australia happened, we saw a change in the type of chemistry that the annual growth rings and coral were depositing. so we have seen a chronology of increased siltation, of increased fertilization, of
CNN
Oct 6, 2012 5:00am PDT
on the science now in question. here's susan candiotti. >> reporter: former massachusetts chemist annie dookhan. >> could you tell us what happened. >> reporter: the state of massachusetts is accusing dookhan of tampering with drug evidence that could call into question at least 34,000 cases going back to 2003. 34,000. at the moment she faces only three charges. however, in boston alone, the d.a. estimates as many as 500 convicted felons could be set free. how big of a mess is this? >> at this point, susan, we don't know. >> reporter: at this lab now closed by the state dookhan allegedly mishandled drugs seized by police for evidence at trial. she allegedly estimated the amount of drugs at times by simply looking at them and certified some drugs as cocaine that are now testing negative. she didn't just write down the wrong thing. prosecutors accuse her of doctoring evidence to change test results. >> she would take known cocaine from an area that she knew was cocaine and actually add them to the sample to make it cocaine. >> incredible story. let's turn to cnn contributor paul callen for legal
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 67 (some duplicates have been removed)